How important are the important things? Part 3 – Are insights that insightful?

“She doesn’t believe in shooting stars, but she believes in shoes and cars. She has always had a passion for flashing, before she had it, she would close her eyes and imagine”

That is one of my favorite insights, that I soo shamelessly stole from a Kanye West song and included it in a brief I wrote for a Saks Fifth Avenue campaign. The campaign ended quite successfully and in no way do I dare take recognition from the creative work, but I would like to believe that the information I shared with them gave them a small push for that giant leap.

What is an insight? How does it help?

According to Wikipedia (so it must be true); an insight is a statement based on a deep understanding of your target consumers’ attitudes and beliefs, which connect at an emotional level with your consumer, provoking a clear response “This brand understands me!”

For example, what do you usually do once your done with an extremely delicious meal that required you to use your fingers while eating? I for one lick them dry and enjoy every second of it –> this is the insight from which KFC was able to, successfully, come up with “It’s finger lickin’ good”.

Having the insight as part of the core message is also key to break all the barriers in the consumers mind and connect with them on an emotional level.

“Speak to their emotions and not to their brains. You can say the right thing about a product and nobody will listen. You’ve got to say it in such a way that people will feel it in their gut. Because if they don’t feel it, nothing will happen” Bernbach

In a nutshell, you cannot have a building built without initially drawing out its schematics. Having a well-rounded connection brief, built on research and insights is an extremely important step for a successful campaign.

Do people still think the Brand Navigation teams are like deliverymen?


2 Comments on “How important are the important things? Part 3 – Are insights that insightful?”

  1. Nisreen says:

    Great thoughts, I had an MD that used to always say “Sh%T brief in. Sh&T creative out.”
    I believe it’s not people that define the brand navigation as deliverymen, unfortunately most of the time it’s defining the different departments in the agencies such as planning, client servicing, creative, digital, etc… We should have an advertising culture that has no definition of roles and where people can easily
    work across the different departments. I’ve witnessed some great strategies written by creatives, as well as, brilliant creative ideas coming out of brand navigation.

    • Omar says:

      “We should have an advertising culture that has no definition of roles and where people can easily work across the different departments.”

      This can probably happen for non-dinosaurs, but for the rest, its the same as wishing for world peace


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